Category Archives: Fritzing Software

New fritzing release 0.9.3b!

Finally, here’s a fresh release of fritzing, coming with a nice set of new features. Head on over to fritzing.org/download to grab it.

github parts repo

Here’s what’s new:

Continuously updated parts library

The fritzing parts library is now stored online at github and is automatically checked
for updates on every launch. This means you will now get new parts (or fixes) in the moment when they are created. No need to wait for the next Fritzing release to get new parts anymore!
And we are actually using git itself inside of fritzing to do these updates, so this opens up many other use cases in the future, like for example direct user contributions.

Critical bug fix for messed up PCB traces

Many of you have been plagued by an annoying bug that occasionally caused PCB traces to get loose and flip around. It proved to be really tricky to track down but it’s finally fixed, sigh.. Plus, the fix will recover any files that have been mangled by this bug. 🙂

High-DPI display support

Fritzing now looks properly on High-DPI (aka Retina) displays on all platforms. It’s not really high-res but scaling nicely according to the higher screen resolution. No more eye squinting with your fancy 4K screen!

Easier handling of self-created parts

Custom / self-made parts and bins used to be stored in a hidden location on your hard
drive, which made it really annoying to edit them with an external tool such as Illustrator
or a text editor.
They are now conveniently located in your ~/Documents/Fritzing folder for easy access!

Load/Save uncompressed fritzing files (.fz)

You can now alternatively save your fritzing sketches as an uncompressed set of files (.fz
plus additional custom parts etc). This allows for proper versioning with systems like git or svn. For regular use, we still recommend using the standard .fzz format, which by the way is just a zip bundle of these files.
Thanks to Sergio Oller (zeehio) for this contribution!

File type associations & icons

fzz, fzb, fzp, etc. now also have shiny file icons on Mac OS X (thanks to scribblemaniac)
and Ubuntu Linux (thanks to el-j).  To get them to actually show up, you will need to wait a little on Mac for them to override the cache, and on Linux  you have to run the install-fritzing.sh script.

New Parts

Loads of new parts, many of them contributed, and all  revised by Fabian Althaus (el-j):

Lots of new SparkFun parts, thanks to support from SparkFun:

Contributed parts:

New/updated Translations

  • Czech, thanks to Vasekdvor
  • German, thanks to Atalanttore and aknoerig
  • Italian, thanks to Gianpaolo Macario
  • Polish, thanks to jacekjaros
  • Portuguese, thanks to Bruno Ramalhete
  • Spanish, thanks to bazza
  • Turkish, thanks to Kaan Özdinçer
  • Vietnamese, thanks to Duyệt Đinh Xuân

..and various smaller improvements and fixes, including contributions from Duane Johnson, Luke Benstead, Nicolas Raynaud, scribblemaniac and duff2013. Thanks!

New Book: “Fritzing for Inventors”

There are a zillion books that make use of Fritzing to illustrate circuits, but this one is the first on fritzing itself. We’re honored that the one and only Simon Monk, author of many a maker book, took it up and created the ultimate guide for using fritzing to “take your electronics project from prototype to product.” We provided technical review for the book, so you can be sure it’s using all the tricks.

Fritzing for Inventors

It does a really great job at  giving a quickstart introduction. Then it walks you through each of Breadboard/Schematic/PCB view in detail, and also gives you background tips on approaching electronics projects in general, reading datasheets, etc. The second half of the book focuses on PCB design and production all the way to testing and distribution. It’s all very thorough and keeps a great balance between bird’s eye and detail discussion.

So it’s not just a  software reference, but a really practical handbook on creating prototypes and using Fritzing as the central tool for that. All in all, “Fritzing for Inventors” might be a great holiday read.

Here’s the full table of contents (the one on the publisher’s website seems to be from a draft version):

  • Ch 1. Introduction to Fritzing
  • Ch 2. Quickstart
  • Ch 3. Electronic Invention
  • Ch 4. Breadboarding
  • Ch 5. Schematic Desgin
  • Ch 6. PCB Layout
  • Ch 7. Fabrication
  • Ch 8. Fritzing Arduino (and Other Boards)
  • Ch 9. Custom Parts
  • Ch 10. Example Projects
  • Ch 11. Testing
  • Ch 12. Funding and Distributing
  • Appendix: Resources

It’s Fritzmas! New Fritzing “Code View” release, and a little present

f-xmas-head-blog

Dear Friends of Fritzing!

It’s the time of the year again and we are happy to announce a new release featuring a brand new “Code View” that allows you to program and upload to your microcontroller straight from Fritzing.

To celebrate this, we give you a nice discount on the perfect christmas gift, the Fritzing Creator Kit. Use the discount code FRITZMAS14 to get the kit for 89€ (instead of 95€) and make someone (or yourself) really happy this year. 🙂

Read  more on the release below. code-view This is the new “Code View”! It lets you write your code directly inside Fritzing, and even upload it from there to your microcontroller. It even has a serial monitor. 🙂

We love this, because it makes it even easier for beginners to get started with interactive electronics. And for more advanced people it’s great because you can now keep your code together with the matching circuit–no more confusion!

You can also link to files somewhere else on your hard drive, for example in your local Arduino folder. When the link gets broken, or you just send someone your Fritzing file, don’t worry, because there’s always a backup stored in the Fritzing fzz file. Right now the upload functionality supports Arduino and PICAXE, but more can be added as long as the platform’s IDE has a command line upload option.

091-parts

The new release also brings with it many new parts, many kindly sponsored by their respective makers. Now you can easily document your circuits and fabricate shields/caps/hats etc. for:

Last but not least, the new release fixes a couple of annoying bugs and generally makes it easier for you to contribute to the code. Setting up your build environment is now just a few easy steps. See the full release notes here.

Download Fritzing 0.9.1b from here, and think about a Fritzmas donation on the way to it.

Happy Fritzmas to everyone!

An Intel Galileo Shield: Data Monster

The Data Monster by Lucas Ainsworth is a robot arm that can move in any direction, actuated by servo motors. As he puts it: „Datamonsters are creatures that respond to you. They can see you and respond to your presence and movement. In addition to responding to immediate interactions, they can also be influenced by events happening in the world outside.“

Lucas’ Intel Galileo code for the Arduino IDE to get you started can be found on GitHub. With the code you can calibrate and control the monster and get basic reactions to objects.

A video from Lucas’ first test with the Data Monster.

To make it way easier to attach the required components easily onto the Intel Galileo board we now created a Galileo shield for it and produced it with our Fritzing Fab service. We used the new Galileo shield template that is part of Fritzing.

Get the full Fritzing file including board design from its Fritzing project page.

Galileo DataMonster Fritzing Shield

Fritzing has moved to github!

fritzing-github

 

It took us a while, but we have finally decided to move all Fritzing code to the amazing github. Find it now at:

https://github.com/fritzing

When we started hacking on Fritzing back in 2007, Google Code was all the hype, and SVN had just replaced CVS as a versioning system. All this has changed for good, and today git (and github) have become the reference for collaborative, open-source development.

We were hesitant until now mostly because of our issue tracker: The one at Google Code has served us wonderfully, and the one at github lacks many of the features that we have come to love (like file attachments and powerful tagging/prioritizing). Also, with the move, original issue reporters will not be notified of changes. Ouch. Luckily, all issues have a backlink to their original Google Code issue, so at least the full history is preserved.

We have also taken the opportunity to move our developer docs over to the github wiki. This way it’s all in one place and you can directly edit it if you have enhancements.

So, we welcome all developers to take a look, watch us, star us, fork us, and most importantly, send us pull requests!

 

New fritzing release 0.9!

090b-release We’re happy to announce the release  of a new fritzing version! It comes with a bunch of improvements on the inside and outside. Here’s the scoop:

Upgrade to Qt5

Fritzing is written on top the Qt cross-platform application framework. We have upgraded to their latest version Qt5, which brings stability and speed improvements (especially for Mac OS X users). This also enables us to port fritzing to Android, iOS, etc. — that is, in theory. We still need to give that a try. Thanks to Jonathan and contributor Rohan Lloyd!

Major part family additions

This release brings a number of new parts, especially a number of popular microcontrollers, as the result of several collaboration efforts:

  • ADI analog parts, which make use of split schematics and SPICE output, a new feature sponsored by Analog Devices we will write more about soon
  • Intel Galileo, sponsored by Intel Education
  • Arduino Yún, supported by Arduino
  • Linino One, sponsored by doghunter
  • ChipKIT WF32, MX4 and shields, thanks to Digilent (more to come)
  • Spark Core, thanks to spark community member technobly
  • Atlas Scientific sensors, thanks to Atlas Scientific
  • more Raspberry Pi versions (A, B, B rev2)
  • Teensy 3.0/3.1, because we love it
  • several contributed parts, thanks to FrodeLillerud and others

In addition, there are  several new PCB shapes for Raspberry Pi, Intel Galileo, SparkCore that will make your boards look cooler. Here’s a snapshot of the Intel Galileo shield in action for the Data Monster: Galileo DataMonster Fritzing Shield Finally, the usual set of bugfixes, and nicely updated translations: French (thanks to Arnold Dumas!), German (thanks to atalanttore!), Ukrainian (thanks to netavek!).

Download Fritzing 0.9.0b here. And while you’re at it, kindly consider donating. Thanks!

New Website and New Fritzing Version 0.8.5b Released

New_Fritzing-Website

Hey Fritzing-folks!

Good news! We have updated the Fritzing website and made it look nice and shiny. And even better: You can now also check out the brand new Fritzing 0.8.5b, released on Dez. 15, 2013.

Here is a list of changes to the new release:

  • Fritzing gets a facelift! (special thanks to Christian and Fabian)
  • new Welcome view
  • new Fritzing Creator Kit examples (in both English and German)
  • Tips and Tricks updated
  • First Time Help now a separate dialog
  • binaries built using Qt 4.8.5
  • updated Dutch translation (thanks Dave)
  • updated German translation
  • new parts:
    • Breadboard BB 301 (contributed by Jeremy)
    • RGB LED WS2812
  • bug fixes:
    • Mac OSX Mavericks Parts Bin Hover crash
    • Saving files with custom parts: sometimes the fzp did not list the latest svg files
    • Boost 1.54 bug no longer crashes Fritzing
    • Many part tweaks

This is a high-level summary of changes between each release. If you’re interested in the detailed changes, take a look at the individual code changes.

Fabulous Fab news!

We have some exciting news for our beloved fab service users!

  1. Finally you get a black silkscreen on both sides of your boards for no extra cost! PCBs with submitted  top and bottom silkscreen layers will be fabbed with both layers, as simple as that! By the way since release 0.8.0  you can flip your board in PCB view and work on the bottom layer copper and silkscreen as if you had the board in your hand.
  2. We dropped the tracked post shipping in Europe and rest of the world because it was too slow and the tracking was inefficient. Instead, you will be able to choose between UPS Standard, which is much faster, insured and trackable in real time, and UPS Express for your shipments in Europe. Customers outside of Europe will be able to choose the very affordable but untracked and slow traditional postal shipping or the 48h Express shipping service. Check out our pricing page for the new fees.
  3. We added a “Billing Address” field to your order page for the people who need to have their orders shipped to a different address than the billing address.

Happy fabbing!

UPS Airlines

900

1000 new parts!

900

Well, almost 1000–certainly 900+. The image above is just a small fraction of the set of new parts available in Fritzing 0.8.1. The parts all come originally from the open source SparkFun Eagle Library (thank you SparkFun!) and the conversion was carried out partly by program, and partly by hand. You can thank our illustrator Fabian for so many beautiful breadboard view images. This new heatsink is one of my favorites:

heatsink

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Originally we intended to ship these parts with a new Parts Bin UI to make it easier to navigate through them all. Alas, the Fritzing project being perpetually undermanned–and the demand for these parts being so high–we decided to put off the UI work until later. So the new parts simply arrive in nine shiny new Parts Bin containers, with nine new tabs to click in the Parts Bin window. Another shortcoming is that the new parts have not been completely integrated (from a database point-of-view), so part-swapping is mostly not possible between core parts and the new parts.

But we have a good workaround for these missing features. The Parts Bin search function (the topmost tab in the Parts Bin window) is quite effective for finding parts, especially since we have added a new ‘and’ search. Just separate the terms with spaces; the image below shows an ‘and’ search for parts matching both ‘db’ and ’25’.

db25

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The other goal we didn’t reach in this release was to enforce a single schematic-view image standard (based on a 0.1 inch grid), instead of the current hodge-podge (the majority based on a 7.5mm grid). The new parts all use the new standard, and we plan to convert the rest of the core parts in the next release or so. In the image below, examples from the old ‘standard’ are on the left, examples of the the new standard are on the right (the image is zoomed to 200%).

schematics

Despite the work we left unfinished, the addition of a thousand new parts is quite a big step forward for Fritzing. We hope you find these parts as useful as we already have.

Enjoy,

— Your Fritzing Team