Fritzing has moved to github!

fritzing-github

 

It took us a while, but we have finally decided to move all Fritzing code to the amazing github. Find it now at:

https://github.com/fritzing

When we started hacking on Fritzing back in 2007, Google Code was all the hype, and SVN had just replaced CVS as a versioning system. All this has changed for good, and today git (and github) have become the reference for collaborative, open-source development.

We were hesitant until now mostly because of our issue tracker: The one at Google Code has served us wonderfully, and the one at github lacks many of the features that we have come to love (like file attachments and powerful tagging/prioritizing). Also, with the move, original issue reporters will not be notified of changes. Ouch. Luckily, all issues have a backlink to their original Google Code issue, so at least the full history is preserved.

We have also taken the opportunity to move our developer docs over to the github wiki. This way it’s all in one place and you can directly edit it if you have enhancements.

So, we welcome all developers to take a look, watch us, star us, fork us, and most importantly, send us pull requests!

 

Spark Core Shield: Toilet Hack

Another great use of shields for creative electronics especially for  offices and shared flats is the toilet hack that we created during an internal hackathon event at the office.

Well, it most certainly is very useful: who doesn’t know the situation when you really need the toilet only to find that it is – occupied. Again. But those times are over now. Your mobile phone becomes even more useful and indispensable as the toilet hack app enables you at any given time to see right from your seat if the toilet is occupied or not. If your workmate is taking too long, just use the app and the toilet hack knocks the door for you.

IMG_7560

Bildschirmfoto 2014-07-24 um 17.34.02

What is needed to bring it to life? Use the Spark Core Microcontroller and the according shield made by us. Further ingredients are: some cables, a tilt sensor, a little solenoid motor and something to hold the motor.

Attach the tilt sensor to the shield where it says lock and the motor where it says knock. Then just get creative and build something to hold the motor in place to knock at the door; we used a styrofoam block for it, made a hole for the motor and just taped it to the door.

Find all source files in the project gallery!

Maker Camp Berlin is looking for coordinators

Download

In August, the first Maker Camp Berlin is opening its -container- doors. The busy team around Stefania Druga of hackidemia has prepared a wonderful setup, in which 15 makers will get together for a month in a temporary makerspace.

Sign up for the opening party on August 8th, and also don’t hesitate to visit during the process.

We’ve also been told they still have a coordinator position to fill. If you consider yourself a “Master Builder & Designer”, check it out!

A whole bunch of new tutorial episodes!

Stefan

Hey Fritzing folks!

As you might have noticed we are currently busy busy bees producing new tutorial videos for you! You can find the first five already on the blog but many more are yet to come.

They will all concern the Fritzing Creator Kit and its different chapters, aiming to support you not just with our Beginners Book, but also through additional video information.

Of course we will publish not only German but also English videos.

The Fritzings hope you will like them and we are, as always, looking forward to your feedback.

 

New fritzing release 0.9!

090b-release We’re happy to announce the release  of a new fritzing version! It comes with a bunch of improvements on the inside and outside. Here’s the scoop:

Upgrade to Qt5

Fritzing is written on top the Qt cross-platform application framework. We have upgraded to their latest version Qt5, which brings stability and speed improvements (especially for Mac OS X users). This also enables us to port fritzing to Android, iOS, etc. — that is, in theory. We still need to give that a try. Thanks to Jonathan and contributor Rohan Lloyd!

Major part family additions

This release brings a number of new parts, especially a number of popular microcontrollers, as the result of several collaboration efforts:

  • ADI analog parts, which make use of split schematics and SPICE output, a new feature sponsored by Analog Devices we will write more about soon
  • Intel Galileo, sponsored by Intel Education
  • Arduino Yún, supported by Arduino
  • Linino One, sponsored by doghunter
  • ChipKIT WF32, MX4 and shields, thanks to Digilent (more to come)
  • Spark Core, thanks to spark community member technobly
  • Atlas Scientific sensors, thanks to Atlas Scientific
  • more Raspberry Pi versions (A, B, B rev2)
  • Teensy 3.0/3.1, because we love it
  • several contributed parts, thanks to FrodeLillerud and others

In addition, there are  several new PCB shapes for Raspberry Pi, Intel Galileo, SparkCore that will make your boards look cooler. Here’s a snapshot of the Intel Galileo shield in action for the Data Monster: Galileo DataMonster Fritzing Shield Finally, the usual set of bugfixes, and nicely updated translations: French (thanks to Arnold Dumas!), German (thanks to atalanttore!), Ukrainian (thanks to netavek!).

Download Fritzing 0.9.0b here. And while you’re at it, kindly consider donating. Thanks!

A fresh new Fritzing shop

new-fritzing-shop

We have just released a fancy new online shop at shop.fritzing.org. This finally gives the Fritzing Creator Kit, the awesome beginner pack for everyone getting started with Arduino and Fritzing, an adequate stage.

The Creator Kit contents and variants are well explained, and we now offer free shipping for Germany and reduced international rates. Also check out the special deals for schools and universities.

Besides our own shop, you can also purchase the kit through our fine resellers.

As usual, the profit goes towards the continued development of the Fritzing ecosystem.

A little bit of advertisement

You might have noticed the little Google Ad placed in the right column of fritzing.org, and we hope you don’t mind!
We have started experimenting with embedding ads into our websites and you will likely see more of this over the coming weeks. Fritzing is in need of additional revenue streams to continue to serve you with the coolest electronics tool and keep it free-as-in-freedom.

In March we started to combine downloads with donations, a model pioneered by our friends at processing.org. More than 200 fine people have donated since then, thank you so much! It has shown us again that you are out there and continue to support us.

This is about 0.1% of the people who are downloading Fritzing, and we understand that not everyone can spare the money or sees a monetary value in using it. That’s where the ads come in. Turn off your ad blocker and remember that clicking ads effectively means supporting the website that displays it. (Disclaimer: Of course only do so if you are actually interested in the advertised product.)

And as always, let us know what you think. :)